Podcast Season 2, Episode 1: If the (Roman) Shoe fits: Elizabeth M. Greene and footwear from Vindolanda

Dr. Elizabeth M. Greene on excavation using a total station.
Dr. Elizabeth M. Greene

Dr. Greene’s Academic Pages:

Academia

Western University

Recent AIA talks recorded (Archaeology Abridged)

Season 2 of the Peopling the Past Podcast is finally here. This season, we’re shifting our focus to Roman Art and Archaeology. To kick off the newest season, we are joined by Dr. Elizabeth M. Greene, Associate Professor of Classics at Western University. Her research focuses on Roman Provincial material culture and history, with a specialty in the Roman military and the role of women, children and families in frontier military communities, and she is currently the Principal Investigator of the Vindolanda Archaeological Leather Project at the Roman fort of Vindolanda.

Listen in, as Dr. Greene tells us all about an understudied aspect of of daily life at the Roman fort of Vindolanda, notably, the hundreds of shoes that were excavated at the site.

Interested in learning more? Check out this related article by Dr. Greene:

Greene, E.M. 2018. “Footwear and Fashion on the Fringe: Stamps and Decoration on Leather and Shoes from Vindolanda (1993-2016)” in T. Ivleva, J. De Bruin, M. Driessen (eds.), Embracing the Provinces: Society and Material Culture of the Frontier Regions. Oxbow. 143-152. 

Looking for a transcript of this episode? Click here.
Image depicts a brown leather military boot with holes for laces up the top of the boot.
An example of a typical military boot with solid leather sides and lace holes up the front (Image credit: Elizabeth M. Greene).
A brown leather shoe with a curl-like leather cut out along the side.
A shoe with decorative cut out leather found in the fort ditch in the 2019 excavations at Vindolanda (Image credit: Elizabeth M. Greene).
A brown leather shoe with many small fishnet- like holes.
An excellent example of a high-status shoe worn by a child or adolescent with a “fish-net” pattern in the leather (Image credit: Elizabeth M. Greene).
A leather shoe with the back of the shoe intentionally cut out to function as a slip-on type shoe.
A shoe worn by an adolescent with the back heel of the shoe intentionally cut out, perhaps for longer use or greater comfort (this is the shoe Dr. Greene noted as one of her favourites) (Image credit: Elizabeth M. Greene).
A small leather shoe for a baby, with a distinct fishnet pattern.
The side profile of the baby’s booty discussed in the podcast with fish-net patterning in the leather (Image credit: Elizabeth M. Greene).
The outer sole of the baby's boot mentioned in the previous image.
The outer sole with iron studs of the baby’s booty discussed in the podcast (Image credit: Elizabeth M. Greene).
Additional Resources for this Episode

Driel-Murray, C. van. 1993. The Leatherwork. In C. van Driel-Murray, J. P. Wild, M. Seaward and J. Hillam (eds) Vindolanda Research Reports, New Series, Volume III: The early wooden forts. Preliminary reports on the leather, textiles, environmental evidence and dendrochronology, 1-75. Bardon Mill: Roman Army Museum Publications. 

Driel-Murray, C. van. 1999. And did those feet in ancient time… Feet and shoes as a material projection of the self. In P. Baker, C. Forcey, S. Jundi, R. Witcher (eds) TRAC 98: Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference, 131–40.Oxford, Oxbow.

Driel-Murray, C. van. 2001. Vindolanda and the dating of Roman footwear. Britannia 32, 185–97. 

Driel-Murray, C. van. 2001. Footwear in the north-western provinces of the Roman Empire. In O. Goubitz, C. van Driel-Murray, W. Groenman-van Waateringe (eds) Stepping through Time. Archaeological Footwear from Prehistoric Times until 1800, 336–76. Zwolle, Stichting Promotie Archeologie. 

Driel-Murray, C. van. 2002. The leather trades in Roman Yorkshire and beyond. In P. Wilson and J. Price (eds) Aspects of Industry in Roman Yorkshire and the North, 109–23. Oxford, Oxbow. 

Driel-Murray, C. van. 2016. Fashionable footwear: craftsmen and consumers in the north-west provinces of the Roman Empire. In A. Wilson and M. Flohr (eds) Urban Craftsmen and Traders in the Roman World, 132–52. Oxford, Oxford University Press. 

Greene, E.M. 2019. “Metal fittings on the Vindolanda shoes: Footwear and evidence for podiatric knowledge in the Roman world,” in S. Pickup and S. Waite, Surveying Shoes, Slippers and Sandals in Antiquity. Routledge. 310-24.

Greene, E.M. 2018. “Footwear and Fashion on the Fringe: Stamps and Decoration on Leather and Shoes from Vindolanda (1993-2016)” in T. Ivleva, J. De Bruin, M. Driessen (eds.), Embracing the Provinces: Society and Material Culture of the Frontier Regions. Oxbow. 143-152. 

Greene, E.M. 2014. “If the shoe fits: Style and function of children’s shoes from Vindolanda” in R. Collins and F. McIntosh (eds.), Life in the Limes: Studies of the People and Objects of the Roman Frontiers. Oxbow. 29-36. 

Greene, E.M. 2013. “Before Hadrian’s Wall: Early military communities on the Roman frontier in Britain,” in R. Collins and M.F.A. Symonds (eds.), Breaking Down Boundaries: Hadrian’s Wall in the 21st Century, Journal of Roman Archaeology. 17-32. 

One thought on “Podcast Season 2, Episode 1: If the (Roman) Shoe fits: Elizabeth M. Greene and footwear from Vindolanda

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: