Podcast Season 3, Episode 2 – Call the (Roman) Midwife: Ancient Delivery and Childbirth with Tara Mulder

For our next episode of the Peopling the Past podcast, we are joined by Tara Mulder, an Assistant Professor at the University of British Columbia, who talks to us about what a Roman birth may have looked like, who would have been a midwife and what their role was, and how things have changed or stayed the same regarding women and pregnancy from the Roman times to current day.

Peopling the Past Podcast Season 3 Preview

Peopling the Past Podcast is BACK for a third season on a very exciting topic: Women in the Ancient Mediterranean! Join your hosts Dr. Chelsea Gardner and Dr. Melissa Funke for an introduction to SEASON THREE of the Peopling the Past podcast! This season, premiering on May 31, listeners will hear about real women fromContinue reading “Peopling the Past Podcast Season 3 Preview”

Blog Post #57: Crisis, Migration, and Resilience with Stephanie Martin

Next up for our human migration in the past blog series, archaeologist Stephanie Martin gives us a look at her recent work concerning migration in response to the volcanic eruptions of Mount Vesuvius.

Blog Post #48: Treading grapes and crushing olives: the production of wine and oil in the ancient Mediterranean with Dr. Emlyn Dodd

In the second installment of our food-and-drink-themed blog series, we look at the work of Dr. Emlyn Dodd, an archaeologist who explores ancient wine and oil production across the Mediterranean.

Blog Post #47: Pots, People, and Foodways in Roman Republican Italy with Dr. Laura Banducci

To kick off our food-and-drink-themed blog series, we interview Dr. Laura Banducci, who enlightens us about how pottery from the ancient world can tell us how people cooked, and what they ate.

Blog Post #46: Graduate Student Feature with Brittany Bauer

In this week’s Peopling the Past blog post, we present you with another graduate feature. This week we take a look at the work of Brittany Bauer, a PhD student at the University of Bristol, whose research focuses on the culture and foodways of the poor in Roman Italy, and specifically their use of wild plants.

Blog Post #41: Animals, Isotopes, and Bronze Age Elites on Sardinia with Emily Holt

In this blog post, we delve into the exciting research of Dr. Emily Holt, an environmental archaeologist, whose research uses isotope analysis of animal remains to understand patterns of human and animal mobility, economic structures, and political expansion in ancient Sardinia (c. 1700-1000 BCE).

Blog Post #32: Graduate Student Feature with Kate Minniti

In this week’s graduate student feature, we highlight the work of Kate Minniti, a PhD Candidate in Classical, Near Eastern, and Religious Studies at the University of British Columbia, whose research examines the import, use, and meaning of Egyptian and Egyptianizing imports in Archaic Sicily.

Podcast Season 2, Episode 12 – Breaking the Bond: Forced Marriage and Cursed Freedom in Ancient Rome with Katharine Huemoeller

On this episode of the Peopling the Past podcast, we are joined by Dr. Katharine Huemoeller, an Assistant Professor of Roman History at the University of British Columbia.

Listen in, as Dr. Huemoeller takes us through a discussion of the lives of enslaved and freedwomen in ancient Rome and the ways in which status affects a woman’s position and role within the Roman household economy. She also highlights the role that material culture plays in framing our understanding of enslaved and freedwomen in the Roman world.

Podcast Season 2, Episode 11 – Seize the Clay: Pottery Workshops in Sagalassos with Elizabeth Murphy

On this episode of the Peopling the Past podcast, we are joined by Dr. Elizabeth Murphy, an assistant professor of Roman Archaeology at Florida State University.

Listen in, as Dr. Murphy takes us through her research on pottery workshops with a particular focus on the workshops in Sagalassos, Turkey, and what the excavation of these sites can reveal about methods of production, the people involved in pottery production, raw material acquisition and the changing dining habits of citizens in the Roman Empire.