Blog Post #72: Solving the Riddle of the Sphinx with Thierry Petit

Today we continue to explore modern constructions of east and west with Thierry Petit, who discusses the origins and significance of the Sphinx in the ancient Mediterranean.

Blog Post #70: Deconstructing Orientalization with Jessica Nowlin

For the first blog post in our month-long exploration of “east” and “west,” Jessica Nowlin explores the history of the term “orientalization” in Italy, and how abandoning the term could change how we conceive of the ancient Mediterranean as a whole.

Blog Post #69: Beyond East and West: Conceptions of Naukratis

In November we reflect on our conceptions of “east” and “west” through a series of blog posts investigating cross-cultural interaction in the ancient world and modern interpretations of it. We start with a post by our blog editor, Megan Daniels, on the ancient city of Naukratis and its role in 19th-century western European imaginations.

Blog Post #68: Controlling the Restless Dead in Mesopotamia with JoAnn Scurlock

Today for our undead in the classical world blog series, Assyriologist JoAnn Scurlock discusses attitudes surrounding death, burial and funerals, the afterlife, and ghosts in ancient Mesopotamia.

Blog Post #67: Beyond the Grave with Melissa S. Cradic

Continuing with our undead in the classical world blog series, this week archaeologist and Badè Museum curator Melissa Cradic guides us through the complexities of excavating ancient graves, and relationships between the living and the disembodied dead in the ancient near east.

Blog Post #66: Dealing with the Living Dead: The Vampire of Mytilene with Sandra Garvie-Lok and Hector Williams

Today we continue with our blog theme of the undead in the classical world! This time we take a look at the work of Sandra Garvie-Lok and Hector Williams, who take us on a journey through the origins of the modern vampire, vampire folklore, and the story of The Mytilene Vampire.

Blog Post #60: Ephemeral Heritage of Contemporary Mediterranean Displacement with Elizabeth S. Greene and Justin Leidwanger

In the final instalment of Peopling the Past’s Migration Month Blog Series, Elizabeth S. Greene (Brock University) and Justin Leidwanger (Stanford University) discuss fieldwork undertaken under the auspices of the Marzamemi Maritime Heritage Project (MMHP) alongside Leopoldo Repola (Suor Orsola Benincasa University of Naples). This fieldwork documents and makes visible the “ephemeral heritage” encompassed by seagoing vessels used to carry displaced peoples across the Central Mediterranean, including the various objects left behind.