Blog Post # 45: Rediscovering the Sealand: A Little Known Bronze-Age Dynasty in Southern Iraq with Daniel Calderbank

To start off the new year, Peopling the Past brings you another Unknown Peoples blog post. This week we are featuring the work of Daniel Calderbank, an archaeologist and ceramicist who gives us a fascinating look into Sealand, a wetland territory which was home to several important ancient cities such as Ur, Uruk, Larsa, and Lagash.

Blog Post #43: Graduate Student Feature with Annissa Malvoisin

In this week’s Peopling the Past blog post, we present you with another graduate feature. This week we are highlighting the work of Annissa Malvoisin, a PhD candidate at the University of Toronto, whose research investigates the ceramic production and trade industry during Meroitic Nubia and its potential far-reaching networks linking Nile Valley civilizations Egypt and Nubia to Iron Age West African cultures in Nigeria, Niger, Mali, Ghana, and Libya.

Blog Post #33: The Lux Project with Melissa Funke

In this blog post, we highlight the Lux Project, an undergraduate research and digitization project focused on the Hetherington Collection, a collection of around 450 ancient Mediterranean artifacts housed in the Anthropology lab at the University of Winnipeg. A team of about a dozen student volunteers led by Melissa Funke is photographing, researching, and teaching the public about these objects.

Podcast Season 2, Episode 11 – Seize the Clay: Pottery Workshops in Sagalassos with Elizabeth Murphy

On this episode of the Peopling the Past podcast, we are joined by Dr. Elizabeth Murphy, an assistant professor of Roman Archaeology at Florida State University.

Listen in, as Dr. Murphy takes us through her research on pottery workshops with a particular focus on the workshops in Sagalassos, Turkey, and what the excavation of these sites can reveal about methods of production, the people involved in pottery production, raw material acquisition and the changing dining habits of citizens in the Roman Empire.

Podcast Season 2 Episode 8 – Breaking the Mold: Quasi-Official Coinage in Roman Egypt with Irene Soto Marín

On this episode of the Peopling the Past podcast, we are joined by Dr. Irene Soto Marín, an assistant professor of classical studies at the University of Michigan and the assistant curator of numismatics at the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology.

Listen in, as she discusses the role of Quasi-Official Coinage in Roman Egypt, notably coins produced by state agents outside of the official mint in Alexandria in order to respond to local needs.

Blog Post #18: Grad Student Feature with Najee Olya

In this week’s Grad Student Feature, we bring you Najee Olya, PhD Candidate in the Program for Mediterranean Art and Archaeology at the University of Virginia. Najee is systematically studying a large corpus of Greek painted vases representing Africans and reorienting previous assumptions about how these images would have been understood and interpreted by their users.

Blog Post #16: Forgotten Kingdom: The Mitanni, with Mara Horowitz

In our latest instalment of the blog series, “Unknown Peoples”, Dr. Mara Horowitz brings to light the largely unknown Mitanni, a powerful Late Bronze Age state that encompassed parts of northern Syria and southern Turkey.

Blog Post #13: Grad Student Feature with Nadhira Hill

In this week’s student feature, we highlight the work of Nadhira Hill, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Michigan, whose research problematizes the traditionally Athenocentric definition of the Greek symposium through a comparative exploration of the literary sources and material culture related to ancient Greek drinking practices at Athens and Olynthos.

Podcast #12: Thrown Together: Potters, Painters, and Ceramic Production with Sanchita Balachandran

On this episode of the Peopling the Past Podcast, we are joined by Sanchita Balachandran, Associate Director of the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum.

Listen in, as she speaks to us about the sensory experience of ancient potters and painters, her experimental archaeology project at Johns Hopkins, and the underdrawings on Greek painted pottery.